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What Causes Peyronie’s Disease?

Peyronie's disease is likely caused by minor injury to the penis. (See penile trauma.) This type of damage is most often caused by vigorous sex (such as bending the penis during penetration or pressure from a partner's pubic bone), though it can also be caused by sports or other accidents. Injury to the tunica albuginea may result in scar tissue forming in the cells (fibrosis). This scar tissue then forms the plaque of Peyronie's disease. Peyronie's disease is the result of a problem in the way the body heals wounds.

Other Factors

Not all men who suffer mild trauma to the penis get Peyronie's disease. For this reason, most researchers believe there must be genetic or environmental reasons Peyronie's disease plaques form. Men with certain connective tissue disorders (such as Dupuytren's contractures or tympanosclerosis) and men who have a close family member with Peyronie's disease have a greater risk of getting it. Certain health issues, such as high blood sugar, tobacco use, or past pelvic trauma, may also lead to wound healing problems, and may help cause Peyronie's disease.

Stages of Peyronie's Disease

Peyronie's disease is often split into 2 stages: the acute phase and the chronic phase. During both phases, the bent/curved penis may cause problems with sex. You also may have ED.

Acute Phase: The acute phase lasts for 6 to 18 months. During this time, the plaques form in the penis, the bending/curving of the penis gets worse, and you may feel pain when your penis gets hard.

Chronic Phase: The chronic phase is when the plaque stops growing and the penis doesn't bend any further. If there was pain with erection during the acute phase, it often will have ended by this time.