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Hydroceles and Inguinal Hernias

Hydroceles and inguinal (groin) hernias can create problems in males. But do they cause pain and dysfunction? When and how should they be treated? The following information should help you talk to a urologist about these two conditions.

What causes hernias and hydroceles?

Testicles develop near kidneys in the abdomen and descend from that location to their normal position in the scrotum towards the end of pregnancy. In order for the testicles to leave the abdomen, a muscle ring in the groin on each side opens and allows the testicles to drop down to the scrotum. As the testicle descends, the lining of the abdomen also drops to line the scrotum. This channel closes in most boys. If that channel remains open, or reopens, a small amount of fluid can go from the abdomen to the scrotum through this passage. This results in hydrocele. If the channel remains opens or reopens widely, then a portion of the intestine can pass down the channel towards the scrotum. This results in an inguinal hernia.

Hydroceles can also develop due to inflammation or injury within the scrotum. These sometimes resolve over a few months but many remain and require medical attention. Hernias can also be the result of increased pressure that forces part of the intestines through a weak spot in the abdominal wall — straining during bowel movements, heavy lifting, coughing, sneezing or obesity.

What are the symptoms of a hernia?

Only about 25 percent of hernias cause pain or discomfort. However, you may be able to see and feel the bulge that often occurs at the junction of the thigh and groin. About 1 percent of boys develop hernias with premature infant males having a higher incidence. Sometimes, the protruding intestine enters the scrotum and causes pain and/or swelling in the scrotum.

What are the symptoms of a hydrocele?

About 10 percent of male infants have a hydrocele at birth. Seldom causing symptoms, this swelling of the scrotum does not bother a baby and usually disappears in the first year of life, even though the appearance may worry new parents. In older males, a hydrocele usually remains painless but may cause discomfort due to the increased size of the scrotum.

How are hernias treated?

Surgery to repair the muscle ring that did not close properly is recommended for a hernia in a child. Hernias do not go away on their own and may cause problems with digestion leading to emergency surgery. In infants and children, a small incision is made in the groin through which a urologist sutures or sews the channel shut and repairs the muscle ring. This procedure can be done in an outpatient setting. In teenagers and adults, laparoscopic surgery may be considered.

How are hydroceles treated?

Hydroceles require surgical repair if they cause symptoms, such as growing large or changing size significantly during the day. If the hydrocele is uncomplicated, an incision is made in the scrotum. The hydrocele is cut out, removing the tissues involved in the hydrocele. If there are complications, such as a hernia, an incision is made in the inguinal (groin) area. This approach allows repair of hernias and other complicating factors at the same time. In children it is preferable to approach the condition through an inguinal incision in order not to miss a hernia that may otherwise manifest itself later if the scrotal approach is used.

What can be expected after treatment for hernias and hydroceles?

After surgery, there will be discomfort that will require pain medication. In most cases, pain is reduced during the first week so that pain medication is no longer necessary. It may be necessary to restrict full activity for a couple of weeks, depending on your child's age and whether or not both sides were treated. If your son still plays on straddle toys, such as a rocking horse, he may have to avoid them for a time. The testicle and scrotum may stay swollen for several weeks after surgery before returning to normal. After surgery, less than 1 percent of cases have a hernia or hydrocele return.

Frequently asked questions:

Are hernias or hydroceles hereditary?

No. Hernias and hydroceles are common. And while several family members may experience them, there is no evidence that they are inherited.

Is there anything a parent did to cause a hernia or hydrocele in their child?

No.

What is the likelihood of a hernia developing on the other side?

This depends on the age of the child. Younger children treated for a hernia are much more likely to develop a hernia on the other side than older children. In younger children, sometimes a laparoscope is used to look at and evaluate the opposite side. If the examination shows that a hernia is present or likely to occur, then surgical repair is done on both sides as a preventive course of action.

What is the likelihood of a hydrocele developing on the other side?

The risk of developing a hydrocele on the other side is about 5 percent. Because of this low risk, many times the laparoscopic evaluation is not performed.

Do girls develop hydroceles and hernias?

Girls do not develop hydroceles. They can develop hernias but because of their anatomy, girls are 10 times less likely than boys to develop hernias.

 



Reviewed January 2011

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Hydroceles and Inguinal Hernias Glossary
  • abdomen: Also referred to as the belly. It is the part of the body that contains all of the internal structures between the chest and the pelvis.

  • abdominal: in the abdomen, the cavity of this part of the body containing the stomach, intestines and bladder.

  • anatomy: The physical structure of an internal structure of an organism or any of its parts.

  • bowel: Another word for intestines or colon.

  • bowel movement: The act of passing feces (stool) through the anus.

  • groin: The area where the upper thigh meets the lower abdomen.

  • hernia: Condition in which part of an internal organ projects abnormally through the wall of the cavity that contains it.

  • hydrocele: A painless swelling of the scrotum caused by collection of fluid around the testicle.

  • incision: Surgical cut for entering the body to perform an operation.

  • inflammation: Swelling, redness, heat and/or pain produced in the area of the body as a result of irritation, injury or infection.

  • inguinal: Located in or affecting the groin.

  • inguinal hernia: When a section of intestine protrudes through a weakness in the abdominal muscles in the groin area.

  • intestine: The part of the digestive system between the stomach and the anus that digests and absorbs food and water.

  • intestines: the portion of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus consisting of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine.

  • ions: Electrically charged atoms.

  • kidney: One of two bean-shaped organs that filter wastes from the blood and discharge these waste products in urine. The kidneys are located on either side at the level of the 12th ribs toward the back. The kidneys send urine to the bladder through tubes called ureters.

  • kidneys: One of two bean-shaped organs that filter wastes from the blood and discharge these waste products in urine. The kidneys are located on either side at the level of the 12th ribs toward the back. The kidneys send urine to the bladder through tubes called ureters.

  • laparoscope: An instrument in the shape of a tube that is inserted through the abdominal wall to give an examining doctor a view of the internal organs.

  • laparoscopic: Using an instrument in the shape of a tube that is inserted through the abdominal wall to give an examining doctor a view of the internal organs.

  • laparoscopic surgery: Surgery performed with an instrument in the shape of a tube that is inserted through small cuts. Using a small video camera and a few customized instruments, the surgeon can work in many body cavities without dividing skin from muscle thus reducing recovery time and complications.

  • pregnancy: The condition of being pregnant.

  • scrotal: Relating to the scrotum, the sac of tissue that hangs below the penis and contains the testicles.

  • scrotal: Relating to the scrotum, the sac of tissue that hangs below the penis and contains the testicles.

  • scrotum: Also referred to as the scrotal sac. The sac of tissue that hangs below the penis and contains the testicles.

  • suture: Surgical seam where a wound has been closed or tissues have been joined.

  • testicle: Also known as testis. Either of the paired, egg-shaped glands contained in a pouch (scrotum) below the penis. They produce sperm and the male hormone testosterone.

  • tissue: Group of cells in an organism that are similar in form and function.

  • urge: Strong desire to urinate.

  • urologist: A doctor who specializes in diseases of the male and female urinary systems and the male reproductive system. Click here to learn more about urologists. (Download the free Acrobat reader.)

  • urology: Branch of medicine concerned with the urinary tract in males and females and with the genital tract and reproductive system of males.

  • void: To urinate, empty the bladder.

Hydroceles and Inguinal Hernias Anatomical Drawings

click images for a larger view
 

 

 

 

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