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Meatal Stenosis

Male Reproductive SystemMedical Illustration Copyright © 2015 Nucleus Medical Media, All rights reserved Sometimes the opening of the penis where urine passes can become blocked. This can cause problems with urination. This article should help you understand this condition and how it can be treated. How Does the Penis Normally Work? The main roles of the penis are to carry urine and sperm ...

Causes

Meatal stenosis is mostly linked with circumcision and is rarely seen in uncircumcised males. It’s likely that the newly exposed tip of the penis (including the meatus) suffers from a mild injury causing meatus to narrow (stenosis). Uric acid and ammonia crystals are the most common cause for the narrowing of the meatus. These crystals are found in the urine and can be left in the diaper bef...

Treatment

The best way to treat meatal stenosis is with surgery. The stuck bottom part of the meatus is cut apart. This type of surgery is called a “meatotomy.” After surgery, meatal stenosis rarely comes back as long as proper care is taken. Meatal stenosis can also be treated by stretching the opening wider (“dilation”). But this can tear the meatus. While this may relieve symptoms...

Symptoms

The symptoms of meatal stenosis relate to the stream of urine being partly blocked. These can include: Pain or burning while urinating Getting sudden urges to urinate ("urgency") Needing to urinate often ("frequency") A urinary stream that sprays or is hard to aim A small drop of blood at the tip of the penis when finished urinating

After Treatment

Meatotomy works very well. Pain at the tip of the penis can be helped with oral pain killers or warm baths. Bleeding is rare and usually controlled with direct pressure. Recovery time is fast: typically 1 to 2 days. Spreading lubricating ointment or petroleum jelly on the tip of the penis several times a day for 1 to 2 weeks can ease discomfort and help the wound to heal.

Diagnosis

Meatal stenosis is found by your health care provider with a physical exam. A physical exam will show a small, narrowed meatus. This means the pathway is partly blocked. The lower part of the meatus is often stuck together. There’s no need to measure the opening, as that could cause more harm.

More Information

Are urethral polyps life-threatening (malignant)? No. These are benign growths (not cancer). But all surgically removed polyps are sent for biopsy to make sure. When should we start treatment for meatal stenosis? Meatal stenosis isn't an emergency. But you should take care of it as soon as it's found. Do all urethral duplications need surgery? Surgery is needed only in certain cases. One case is w...

Treatment

How a benign lesion is treated depends on the type. Your urologist has many methods to choose from to treat your lesions. Urethral Polyps Urethral polyps can be removed using cystourethroscopy. Your urologist can peer into the urethra with a small, flexible camera and use miniaturized tools to remove the growth. The base of the polyp is burned off with an electric current. Meatal Stenosis Most oft...

Types

Urethral Polyps A urethral polyp is a rare, irregular growth that most often appears at birth. It's often made up of fibrous tissue. It may also include some smooth muscle, small cysts, or nerve tissue, all covered with a thin protective layer of tissue. Meatal Stenosis Meatal stenosis is when the hole at the penis tip is very small. This is caused by irritation around the hole. The irritation ca...

Symptoms

Symptoms of benign urethral lesions in boys depend on the type of lesion your son may have. Urethral Polyps If your son has a urethral polyp, there may be blood in his urine, signs of a urinary tract infection, or problems peeing. These can include: weak or broken urinary stream straining when peeing hesitating before urine flow starts stream stops suddenly dribbling at the end of urination painf...

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