What is Urinary Diversion?

Treatment

What are the Types of Urinary Diversion?

Continent Urinary Diversion
Continent Urinary Diversion
Image: Cancer Research UK

Urostomy (Ileal Conduit)
Urostomy (Ileal Conduit)
Image: Cancer Research UK

Self Catheterisation of a Urinary Diversion
Self Catheterisation of a Urinary Diversion
Image: Cancer Research UK

Bladder Reconstruction
Bladder Reconstruction
Image: Cancer Research UK

There are 2 types of urinary diversions: continent and non-continent.

Non-continent Urinary Diversion

Non-continent urinary diversions often involve linking the ureters to a piece of intestine that is brought out of the belly. The urine then drains continuously into an ostomy bag you wear under your clothes. You'll still be able to take part in strenuous physical activity, as well as daily routines.

Continent Urinary Diversion

For continent urinary diversion, your surgeon will make a pouch inside your body from part of your intestines to hold urine. There are 2 basic types: those that have a stoma brought out of the belly and those in which a neobladder is made. With a neobladder, you are able to pee in a normal way.

With a surgical stoma, you will need to insert a tube into the stoma to drain the urine 4 or 5 times a day.

The advantage of both types of continent urinary diversion is that you don't need to wear an ostomy bag.

After Treatment

What Can I Expect after a Urinary Diversion?

Most people are satisfied with their urinary diversions and are able to return to a normal routine.

Problems with urinary diversions do happen, though, such as:

  • changes in fluid and/or salt levels
  • trouble inserting the tube into the stoma
  • problems with skin growing over the stoma
  • basic problems that might result from an abdominal operation (such as a blocked bowel, or urine or bowel leakage)

More Information

More Information

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I wear normal clothing if I have an ostomy bag?

Most people are able to wear their normal wardrobe.

Will I be on a special diet?

Not usually. Your health care provider will give you orders about fluids and nutrition if needed as you adjust.